How To Apply MasterSeal® NP 100™ Sealant

BASF MasterSeal® NP 100™ High Performance Hybrid Sealant packaged in a 300 ml cartridge
BASF MasterSeal NP 100 High Performance Hybrid Sealant in a 300 ml cartridge package

Watch how to apply MasterSeal NP 100, a high performance, low modulus, high movement, non-sag, fast curing, and ready-to-use hybrid sealant (Video Transcript). Then learn more about the materials, tools and accessories required to do the job safely and efficiently.


MasterSeal NP 100 Sealant Application Video Transcript

  • Ensure substrate is structurally sound, fully cured, dry and clean
  • Use [MasterSeal P 173] primer as necessary
  • If required, install the appropriate size backer rod for the joint
  • When using 300 ml cartridges, cut tip of cartridge for desired width of the sealant bead
  • Puncture foil using a sharp object
  • Insert cartridge into caulking gun
  • When using 20-ounce propaks, insert propak into a bulk caulking gun
  • Open propak with a razor knife, then attach cone to the caulking gun
  • Cut the cone slightly smaller than the width of the joint
  • Fill joint from the deepest point, to the surface
  • Dry tool joints to create a smooth, concave shape
  • Refer to the MasterSeal NP 100 technical data guide for more information.

Sealant Application Materials, Tools and Accessories

Materials, Tools and Accessories – Shown

  • Protective Gloves – 4-mil nitrile, disposable glove
  • Protective Clothing – Long-sleeve sweatshirt
  • MasterSeal P 173 Primer – Quick drying, solvent-based primer for priming joints and substrates
  • Brush
  • Backer Rod – Closed-cell, polyethylene foam, joint filler
  • Wooden Rod, Tapered – Used to press the backer rod completely into the joint
  • MasterSeal NP 100 Sealant, 300 ml Cartridge Package – Preferred for smaller sealant applications
  • Razor Knife
  • Caulking Gun – Manual Cartridge Gun
  • MasterSeal NP 100 Sealant, 20-Ounce ProPak Package – Economical and efficient for larger sealant applications
  • Bulk Caulking Gun – Manual Bulk Gun
  • Bulk Caulking Gun Cone
  • Caulk Spatula – Give a smooth, concave shape to the sealed joint.

Precautionary Accessories – Not Shown

Refer to the MasterSeal NP 100 Safety Data Sheet (SDS) for more information.

  • Eye Protection
  • Face Protection
  • Respiratory Protection – In case of inadequate ventilation
  • Tool Belt.

Citations

Last Modified: July 21, 2019

How To Apply MasterSeal® NP 1™ Sealant

BASF MasterSeal®  NP 1 Sealant packaged in a 300 ml cartridge, inserted into a manual caulking gun
BASF MasterSeal NP 1 Polyurethane Sealant in a 300 ml cartridge package, inserted into a caulking gun

Watch how to apply MasterSeal NP 1, a one-component, high performance, non-priming, gun-grade, elastomeric polyurethane sealant (Video Transcript). Then learn more about the materials, tools and accessories required to do the job safely and efficiently.

How To Apply MasterSeal® NP 1 Sealant

MasterSeal NP 1 Sealant Application Video Transcript

  • Ensure substrate is structurally sound, fully cured, dry and clean
  • Use [MasterSeal P 176] primer as necessary
  • If required, install the appropriate size backer rod for the joint
  • When using 300 ml cartridges, cut tip of cartridge for desired width of the sealant bead
  • Puncture foil using a sharp object
  • Insert cartridge into caulking gun
  • When using 20-ounce propaks, insert propak into a bulk caulking gun
  • Open propak with a razor knife, then attach cone to the caulking gun
  • Cut the cone slightly smaller than the width of the joint
  • Fill joint from the deepest point, to the surface
  • Dry tool joints to create a smooth, concave shape
  • Refer to the MasterSeal NP 1 technical data guide for more information.

Sealant Application Materials, Tools and Accessories

Materials, Tools and Accessories – Shown

  • Protective Gloves – 4-mil nitrile, disposable glove
  • Protective Clothing – Long-sleeve sweatshirt
  • MasterSeal P 176 Primer – High-solids, low-VOC, solvent-based primer for priming joints and substrates
  • Brush
  • Backer Rod – Closed-cell, polyethylene foam, joint filler
  • Wooden Rod, Tapered – Used to press the backer rod completely into the joint
  • MasterSeal NP 1 Sealant, 300 ml Cartridge Package – Preferred for smaller sealant applications
  • Razor Knife
  • Caulking Gun – Manual Cartridge Gun
  • MasterSeal NP 1 Sealant, 20-Ounce ProPak Package – Economical and efficient for larger sealant applications
  • Bulk Caulking Gun – Manual Bulk Gun
  • Bulk Caulking Gun Cone
  • Caulk Spatula – Give a smooth, concave shape to the sealed joint.

Precautionary Accessories – Not Shown

Refer to the MasterSeal NP 1 Safety Data Sheet (SDS) for more information.

  • Eye Protection
  • Face Protection
  • Respiratory Protection – In case of inadequate ventilation
  • Tool Belt.

Citations

Last Modified: July 21, 2019

DOWSIL™ Case Study Cornish Commons – Seattle, Washington

Cornish Commons residence hall with unique rainscreen design - Seattle, WA
Cornish Commons residence hall with unique rainscreen design – Seattle, Washington

A premier college for the visual and performing arts, Cornish College of the Arts’ main campus is located in Seattle’s popular South Lake Union neighborhood, where the 20-story Cornish Commons opened in 2015.

The new residence hall and academic building includes a unique rainscreen design featuring 3/16-inch thick architectural aluminum cladding on cold-form framing. The innovative building design boasts thermal performance 40% better than required by current Seattle Building Code.

Cornish Commons’ Challenge

To achieve its ambitious thermal performance, the rainscreen design includes 2-inch, continuous R-8, exterior insulation to supplement the R-32 interior batt/cavity insulation. But that created additional challenges to be compliant with the Seattle Building Code, which dictates use of insulation outboard of the metal framing. The proposed design needed an air barrier with high permeability to ensure water vapor was not trapped in the wall cavity.

Additionally, staying on schedule – in spite of challenging Seattle weather conditions – was critical. Minimizing product incompatibility issues also was important.

Cornish Commons’ Solution

Ankrom Moisan Architects, Inc. selected the 100% silicone DOWSIL Silicone Air Barrier System to ensure enclosure airtightness performance, durability and compatibility.

When we learned about the option of a fluid-applied silicone air and water barrier, we realized that DOWSIL DefendAir 200 was ideal for our needs. Not only did the spray-applied product simplify installation and eliminate the need for traditional membrane materials, its high permeability ensured our design’s compliance with Seattle Building Code.

Eric Bressman, Architect, Ankrom Moisan Architects

Unitized Construction

To keep the Cornish Commons project on schedule, the design called for a combination of unitized rainscreen panels and traditional construction techniques. The use of unitized panels assembled off-site in a controlled manufacturing environment enabled continued productivity, regardless of weather.

An external cladding contractor’s licensed use of a patented, universal joint system (U.S. Patent 8,943,773) facilitated construction of the unitized panels. This system is designed with interlocking joints that mitigate improper installation conditions that increase the risk of failure.ß The joint system relies on DOWSIL sealants for enhanced performance.

The panels used DOWSIL silicones exclusively: DOWSIL DefendAir 200 as an air barrier and DOWSIL 791 Silicone Weatherproofing Sealant for unit sealing. The quick cure capability of the DOWSIL products helped keep unit assembly on schedule. The unitized rainscreen system was used from the third floor to the 20th floor – using 30 units per floor – with approximately 50,000 square feet protected by the DOWSIL Silicone Air Barrier System.

All-Weather Installation

Construction on-site continued into late fall, due in part to the low-temperature installation capability of DOWSIL DefendAir 200, which can be applied at temperatures as low as 20°F (-6°C).

The ability to use spray-applied product was much easier, said Jerry Jensen, Project Manager. Its cold-weather ability allowed us to continue construction into inclement fall weather.

In addition to the unitized rainscreen panels, on-site work totaling nearly 8,000 square feet used the DOWSIL Silicone Air Barrier System on the first and second floors.

Confidently Build A Better Barrier – Simple. Compatible. Silicones.

Because it is not uncommon to face challenges with varying interfacing construction materials, having a compatible all-silicone solution from Dow was appreciated and advantageous.

Having exclusively silicone products ensured compatibility. Rather than an ‘origami’ of incompatible materials around openings, having all-silicone materials simplified construction and eliminated uncertainty. It is straightforward. We can get answers from a single, trusted manufacturer, without unproductive back-and-forth exchanges with multiple suppliers. It’s helpful to have the continuity and support – and the confidence of warranty protection – from [Dow.]

Jerry Jensen, Project Manager, external cladding contractor

Additionally, the all-silicone compatibility of the DOWSIL Silicone Air Barrier System allowed materials to be applied in any order, eliminating sequencing delays and expenses.

Learn More About DOWSIL Silicone Air Barrier System

Dow High Performance Building solutions include proven and innovative materials for structural and protective glazing, weatherproofing, insulating glass, high-efficiency insulation, and window and door fabrication. Learn more about the DOWSIL Silicone Air Barrier System and other High Performance Building solutions from Dow.

Citations

Last Modified: May 24, 2019

Fort Casey Restoration – Whidbey Island, WA

Coastal artillery gun at Fort Casey State Park, Whidbey Island, Washington
Fort Casey Coastal Gun Battery – Whidbey Island, Washington

Project Name: The Fort Casey and Battery Moore Project

Fort Casey History

Located on Whidbey Island in Washington State, Fort Casey was one of 29 locations chosen for updated reinforcement. As a part of what was known as the “Triangle of Fire”, Fort Case, Fort Worden and Fort Flagler had to defend the entrance of the Puget Sound. Construction began in 1897 and ended in 1901 but the fort was equipped and used for training until the mid-1940’s.

In 1955, Washington State Parks acquired Fort Casey and opened it up for public use. With the help of some government funds, the fort grounds had regular maintenance but other parts of the Battery Moore section were in major need of some repairs. Most of the original concrete showed major signs of damage due to substantial corrosion of the reinforcing steel.

Finally in 2006, the Washington State Parks department made a budget of $600,000 to begin a full structural overhaul on the Battery Moore. The restoration was going to return the structure to its original glory while adding some modern elements along the way and with the use of batteries, lights and speakers it would turn the Battery into a live action example of how Fort Casey operated in the early 1900’s.

Phase 1 of the Repair

The engineering and architect team inspected and developed a scope of work for the impending repairs. After a full survey was performed, the focus was not only on repairing the existing structures but also about protecting against the brutal salt air from the Puget Sound. With all of this in mind, the design team put together a scope of work for Phase 1 that included repairs on gun emplacements 3 and 4 with gun emplacements 1 and 2 to be done in Phase 2.

During Phase 1, after the concrete preparation was completed, the repair work began with the cathodic protection on the existing square bar steel reinforcement. This was crucial to the project as the original concrete was mixed using local sand and aggregates directly from the sound. The existing concrete showed high levels of chloride so any materials used had to prevent future corrosion. All repair mortars were highly polymer modified and included integral corrosion inhibitors to protect the surrounding steel. There was also a significant amount of epoxy injections performed on many of the vertical surfaces while fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) materials were used to strengthen the deteriorated columns.

Phase 2 of the Repair

Over the next 10 years, additional funding had to be secured to begin Phase 2, which came out to approximately $200,000 (a third of the Phase 1 budget). To repair 1 and 2 of the gun emplacements, the scope of work had to be paired down significantly. With another 10 years of deterioration to take into consideration, the focus of Phase 2 was mainly to restore the structural integrity of the Battery Moore.

When Phase 2 began, the team noted that there were areas with extreme cracking and some critical areas on the verge of collapse. While preparing the concrete, the source of existing concrete aggregate needed to be addressed. Large, rounded river rocks (some 4 inches in diameter) were used throughout the gun emplacements. In conjunction with this system, the existing concrete became extremely soft. As the crew removed the deteriorated concrete, some areas became so fragile that they would disintegrate on impact with an electric chipping hammer. No heavy equipment was used in the prep work due to the fragile structural capacity of the existing concrete. With most of the square steel reinforcement intact after sand blasting, the existing reinforcement was coated with epoxy rebar stirrups to support the repairs.

Sika® Product Solution

Both Phase I and Phase II of the Fort Casey restoration project used these Sika products:

  • SikaQuick® VOH and SikaTop® 123 for the vertical and overhead repairs
  • Sikagard® 705 L to permeate the concrete substrates using silane technology
  • Sikadur® 31 to bond concrete and seal cracks around injection ports
  • Sikadur 52 to seal concrete slabs and protect against water, chlorides and other elements that cause deterioration
  • Sikaflex® 1A to seal all vertical and horizontal joints.

Conclusion

Sika was honored to contribute products to help aid in the restoration of this historical landmark. Overall, the impact of both repair phases were very extensive but the contractor was able to restore the Battery Moore into a safe and education public area. People are now able to wander the grounds and begin to feel the sense of what it was like to work and live in Fort Casey during both World Wars.

Citations

Last Modified: January 27, 2019